Consciousness sleep dreams hypnosis and drugs

He was just very, very wise. Robert Baker, considered an expert in the workings of the human mind and one of America's pre-eminent ghost busters, died Monday at his home in Lexington. Baker, former chairman of the University of Kentucky psychology department, spent a good deal of his time using science and reason to explain away things that seemed to defy natural laws for others.

Consciousness sleep dreams hypnosis and drugs

A person may enter an altered state of consciousness through such things as sensory deprivation or overload, neurochemical imbalance, fever, or trauma. One may also achieve an altered state by chanting, meditating, entering a trance state, or ingesting psychedelic drugs.

The testimonies of mystics and meditators who claim that their ability to enter altered states of consciousness has brought them enlightenment or transcendence are generally regarded with great skepticism among the majority of scientists in Western society.

Other researchers, especially those in the field of parapsychology, maintain that Western science must recognize the value of studying altered states of consciousness and face up to the fact that what scientists consider baseline or normal consciousness is not unitary.

In the opinion of many parapsychologists, science must abandon the notion that waking, rational consciousness is the only form of any value and that all other kinds are pathological. Researchers who study aspects of human consciousness have suggested that within the course of a single day an individual may flicker in and out of several states of consciousness.

Some theorize that there are six states of "nonreflective consciousness," characterized by the absence of self-consciousness.

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Bodily feelings, which are induced by normal bodily functioning and are characterized by nonreflective awareness in the organs and tissues of the digestive, glandular, respiratory, and other bodily systems.

This awareness does not become self-conscious unless such stimuli as pain or hunger intensify a bodily feeling. Stored memories, which do not become self-conscious until the individual reactivates them.

Coma, which is induced by illness, epileptic seizures, or physical injuries to the brain, and is characterized by prolonged nonreflective consciousness of the entire organism.

Stupor, which is induced by psychosis, narcotics, or over-indulgence in alcohol, and is characterized by greatly reduced ability to perceive incoming sensations. Non-rapid-eye-movement sleep, which is caused by a normal part of the sleep cycle at night or during daytime naps, and is characterized by a minimal amount of mental activity, which may sometimes be recalled upon awakening.

Consciousness sleep dreams hypnosis and drugs

Rapid-eye-movement sleep, which is a normal part of the nighttime sleep cycle, and is characterized by the mental activity known as dreams. The reflective, or self-conscious, states of consciousness are: Pragmatic consciousness, the everyday, waking conscious state, characterized by alertness, logic, and rationality, cause-and-effect thinking, goal-directedness.

In this level of consciousness, one has the feeling that he or she is in control and has the ability to move at will from perceptual activity to conceptual thinking to idea formation to motor activity. Lethargic consciousness, characterized by sluggish mental activity that has been induced by fatigue, sleep deprivation, feelings of depression, or certain drugs.

Hyperalert consciousness, brought about by a period of heightened vigilance, such as sentry duty, watching over a sick child, or by certain drugs, such as amphetamines. Levels or types of consciousness with varying degrees of what could be considered an altered state might include: Rapturous consciousness, characterized by intense feelings and overpowering emotions and induced by sexual stimulation, the fervor of religious conversion, or the ingestion of certain drugs.

Hysterical consciousness, induced by rage, jealousy, fear, neurotic anxiety, violent mob activity, or certain drugs. As opposed to rapturous consciousness, which is generally evaluated as pleasant and positive in nature, hysterical consciousness is considered negative and destructive.

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Fragmented consciousness, defined as a lack of integration among important segments of the total personality, often results in psychosis, severe neurosis, amnesia, multiple personality, or dissociation. Such a state of consciousness is induced by severe psychological stress over a period of time.

It may also be brought about temporarily by accidents or psychedelic drugs. Relaxed consciousness, characterized by a state of minimal mental activity, passivity, and an absence of motor activity.

This state of consciousness may be brought about by lack of external stimulation, such as sunbathing, floating in water, or certain drugs.

CONSCIOUSNESS: Sleep, Dreams, Hypnosis and Drugs - The World of Psychology

Daydreaming, induced by boredom, social isolation, or sensory deprivation. Trance consciousness, induced by rapt attentiveness to a single stimulus, such as the voice of a hypnotist, one's own heartbeat, a chant, certain drugs, or trance-inducing rituals and primitive dances.

The trance state is characterized by hypersuggestibility and concentrated attention on one stimulus to the exclusion of all others.An altered state of consciousness is a brain state wherein one loses the sense of identity with one's body or with one's normal sense perceptions.A person may enter an altered state of consciousness through such things as sensory deprivation or overload, neurochemical imbalance, fever, or trauma.

An altered state of consciousness is any state in which a person's sense perceptions are different than normal.

Quizzes › Science › Psychology › Psychology: Chapter 4- Consciousness: Sleep, Dreams, Psychology: Chapter 4- Consciousness: Sleep, Dreams, Hypnosis, And Drugs. 26 Questions | By GraffitiSunshine | Last updated: Jan 31, but now that she has a government job she has avoided using any recreational drugs. Although . Chapter 4: Consciousness: Sleep, Dreams, Hypnosis, and Drugs. Chapter 4. STUDY. PLAY. state in which there is a shift in the quality or pattern of mental activity as compared to waking consciousness. circadian rhythm. a cycle of bodily rhythm that occurs over a hour period. bad dreams occurring during REM sleep. 1. OBITUARY JACOB H. CONN (), 86, A PSYCHIATRIST, IS DEAD: NEW YORK TIMES: Dr. Jacob Harry Conn, a psychiatrist and educator for 50 years, died Wednesday at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore. He was 86 years old and lived in Baltimore. Dr. Jacob Harry Conn, a psychiatrist and educator for 50 years, died Wednesday at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore.

Learn more about this concept with examples and test your knowledge with a quiz. Sleep/dreaming research has shown that people continue to maintain some level of awareness concerning external stimuli during sleep (ex. Parents may sleep through a. 4. consciousness: sleep, dreams, hypnosis and drugs.

Learning Objectives. LO Consciousness and levels of consciousness LO Why sleep and how sleep works LO Stages of sleep and dreaming LO Sleep disorders and normal sleep LO Why people dream and what they dream about. Chapter 4: Consciousness: Sleep, Dreams, Hypnosis, and Drugs.

Chapter 4. STUDY. PLAY. state in which there is a shift in the quality or pattern of mental activity as compared to waking consciousness.

circadian rhythm. a cycle of bodily rhythm that occurs over a hour period.

Consciousness sleep dreams hypnosis and drugs

bad dreams occurring during REM sleep. 1. OBITUARY JACOB H. CONN (), 86, A PSYCHIATRIST, IS DEAD: NEW YORK TIMES: Dr. Jacob Harry Conn, a psychiatrist and educator for 50 years, died Wednesday at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore.

He was 86 years old and lived in Baltimore. Dr. Jacob Harry Conn, a psychiatrist and educator for 50 years, died Wednesday at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore.

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